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Introduction to heparin sodium

  

  DESCRIPTION

  Heparin Sodium Injection, USP is a sterile, nonpyrogenic solution of heparin sodium (derived from porcine intestinal mucosa) in water for injection. Each container contains 10000, 12500, 20000 or 25,000 USP Heparin Units; 40 or 80 mg sodium chloride added to render isotonic (see HOW SUPPLIED section for various sizes and strength). May contain sodium hydroxide and/or hydrochloric acid for pH adjustment. pH 6.0 (5.0 to 7.5).

  The solution contains no bacteriostat, antimicrobial agent or added buffer and is intended for use only as a single-dose injection. When smaller doses are required, the unused portion should be discarded.

  Heparin sodium in the ADD-Vantage™ system is intended for intravenous administration only after dilution.

  Heparin Sodium, USP is a heterogenous group of straight-chain anionic mucopolysaccharides, called glycosamino-glycans having anticoagulant properties. Although others may be present, the main sugars occurring in heparin are: (1) α- L-iduronic acid 2-sulfate, (2) 2-deoxy-2-sulfamino-α-D-glucose-6-sulfate, (3) β-D-glucuronic acid, (4) 2-acetamido-2-deoxy-α-D-glucose, and (5) α-L-iduronic acid. These sugars are present in decreasing amounts, usually in the order (2) > (1) > (4) > (3) > (5), and are joined by glycosidic linkages, forming polymers of varying sizes. Heparin is strongly acidic because of its content of covalently linked sulfate and carboxylic acid groups. In heparin sodium, the acidic protons of the sulfate units are partially replaced by sodium ions. The potency is determined by a biological assay using a USP reference standard based on units of heparin activity per milligram.