<

What is heparin sodium and what does it do

       Dalteparin is an anticoagulant that helps prevent the formation of blood clots.

  Dalteparin is used together with aspirin to prevent blood vessel complications in people with certain types of angina (chest pain) or heart attack.

  Dalteparin is also used to prevent a type of blood clot called deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which can lead to blood clots in the lungs (pulmonary embolism). A DVT can occur after certain types of surgery, or in people who are bed-ridden due to a prolonged illness.

  Dalteparin is also used long-term to treat a type of blood clot called venous thromboembolism (VTE) in people with cancer.

  Dalteparin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

  You should not use this medicine if you have active bleeding, or a low level of platelets in your blood after testing positive for a certain antibody while using dalteparin.

  Dalteparin can cause a very serious blood clot around your spinal cord if you undergo a spinal tap or receive spinal anesthesia (epidural), especially if you have a genetic spinal defect, a history of spinal surgery or repeated spinal taps, or if you are using other drugs that can affect blood clotting, including blood thinners or NSAIDs (ibuprofen, Advil, Aleve, and others). This type of blood clot can lead to long-term or permanent paralysis.

  Get emergency medical help if you have symptoms of a spinal cord blood clot such as back pain, numbness or muscle weakness in your lower body, or loss of bladder or bowel control.

  You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to dalteparin, heparin, or pork products, or if you have:active or uncontrolled bleeding; ora history of blood clot or low levels of platelets in your blood while using heparin.

  Dalteparin may cause you to bleed more easily, especially if you have:a bleeding disorder that is inherited or caused by disease;hemorrhagic stroke;an infection of the lining of your heart (also called bacterial endocarditis);uncontrolled high blood pressure;stomach or intestinal bleeding or ulcer; orrecent brain, spine, or eye surgery.

  Dalteparin can cause a very serious blood clot around your spinal cord if you undergo a spinal tap or receive spinal anesthesia (epidural). This type of blood clot could cause long-term or permanent paralysis, and may be more likely to occur if:you have a genetic spinal defect;you have a spinal cord injury;you have a spinal catheter in place or if a catheter has been recently removed;you have a history of spinal surgery or repeated spinal taps;you have recently had a spinal tap or epidural anesthesia;you take an NSAID (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug)--ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin), naproxen (Aleve), diclofenac, indomethacin, meloxicam, and others; oryou take a blood thinner (warfarin, Coumadin) or other medicines to treat or prevent blood clots.

  To make sure dalteparin is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have ever had:eye problems caused by diabetes or high blood pressure;severe liver or kidney disease;recent stomach bleeding;low levels of platelets in your blood; orif you have recently had a spinal tap or epidural anesthesia.

  It is not known whether this medicine will harm an unborn baby. However, some forms of dalteparin contain a preservative that may be harmful to a newborn. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment.

  Dalteparin can pass into breast milk, but effects on the nursing baby are not known. Tell your doctor if you are breast-feeding.